A police officer’s daily mission against terrorism

Today marks the 12 th anniversary of Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center. Amid the chaos and catastrophe, many men and women struggled for their lives and many lost. Among those who made the ultimate sacrifice were countless public safety...


Today marks the 12th anniversary of Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center. Amid the chaos and catastrophe, many men and women struggled for their lives and many lost. Among those who made the ultimate sacrifice were countless public safety servants—police officers, firefighters and EMS—who were, at the time, “just doing their jobs”.

A grateful country remembers. Last Friday in Battery Park City, New York City officials honored law enforcement officers who died in the attacks at their annual ceremony at the Police Memorial Wall.

In the past twelve years law enforcement in particular has had to not shift focus, but expand its training and intelligence to answer the need for increased homeland security and counterterrorism efforts at federal, state and local levels.

The folks at Rand Corp. recently conducted a study “Long-Term Effects of Law Enforcement’s Post-9/11 Focus on Counterterrorism and Homeland Security” that tracked five major U.S. law enforcement agencies and considered how their efforts had changed in light of the attacks. In examining the long-term adjustments of these departments, the study found a greater emphasis has been placed on information sharing between units and the creation of specialized departments. Perhaps not surprisingly, it noted a distinct difficulty in quantifying the benefits of more CT and HS resources amid the recent economic downturn.

How fast time flies. But in reality this country is still responding to 9-11 every day. Every day men and women in this country are holding the course and moving forward to prevent further assaults to our freedom and security.

Today we take the time to thank all members of public safety for facing the daily unknown, and for protecting the lives and the inalienable rights of all American citizens, sometimes at a great price.

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