Is There Power In Adversity?

Law Enforcement professionals face adversity every day. If they've lived a pristine life with no pain or challenges, how can they possibly be prepared?


I'm talking about the child of a single mom who works full time and manages to keep her home in order as well as caring for her child, and when another kid calls her a whore, her son punches that insulting kid in the mouth.  While the child will no doubt get in trouble, he's proven that, when he feels justified, he is willing to stand up and fight for what he believes in.

I'm talking about the child who sees his sister or brother in a fight, or being picked on, and he jumps in to stand beside his sibling, fighting as necessary to protect them.  While he might get in trouble, he is protecting and defending a member of his family and he's proven he is willing to stand up and fight for a righteous cause.

THOSE kids might not ever become police officers or deputy sheriffs.  THOSE kids will have a 'discipline problem' noted in their school records that might disqualify them from becoming law enforcement professionals.  THOSE kids are exactly the kids I would want to hire to work for me.  I can channel and guide their warrior instincts.  I can provide them rules and regulations under which they can accordingly behave.  I can counsel them and lead them and trust that they will do what's right 99.9% of the time provided I give them the necessary leadership required.  THOSE kids have faced some adversity, in the form of physical altercation growing up; they've faced it, confronted it head on, and not backed down.  THOSE kids have the warrior spirit that can be grown and nurtured and made to blossom honorably.

Unfortunately, in today's society and in the world of 'risk adverse' hiring, THOSE kids might not ever pin on a badge or star.

It could just be me, but I think we're missing the boat when it comes to optimal hiring practices.  What do you think?

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