Reviewed in 2012 - A Product Collection

Investigator-Virtual Reality (I-VR), National Forensic Science Technology Center, University of Tennessee Law Enforcement Innovation Center “Virtual reality: A reality for crime scene training” by Rebecca Kanable Brian Cochran, a detective for...


Investigator-Virtual Reality (I-VR), National Forensic Science Technology Center, University of Tennessee Law Enforcement Innovation Center

“Virtual reality: A reality for crime scene training” by Rebecca Kanable

Brian Cochran, a detective for 11 years, is a graduate of UT’s National Forensic Academy and was among those who helped develop the training. “Overall, the training is meant to be introductory,” says Cochran, who works in the crime scene unit of the Boone County Sheriff’s Office in Kentucky. “It [covers] general things: scene security, searching for evidence, and properly packaging, documenting and photographing evidence—the fundamentals of crime scene management and processing.”

Entry-level law enforcement personnel who may want to become crime scene investigators or forensic practitioners can benefit from I-VR. The training can also be used as a refresher for seasoned investigators, says Emily Miller, a specialist with LEIC at UT’s Institute for Public Service.

I-VR is an online version of NFA’s 10-week, in-residence program for crime scene investigators. During the online training, students work with a virtual instructor to learn the tools, processes and skills required to manage a crime scene and find evidence. As they complete the lessons, students become virtual crime scene investigators who collect evidence and document a virtual case.

For active law enforcement officers who register in 2012, the Investigator-Virtual Reality (I-VR) training is free of charge and funded by the National Institute of Justice. The joint efforts of UT and NFSTC working on Investigator-Virtual Reality earned a Best Collaboration Award at the 2012 BizTech Innovation Summit Awards & Expo.

Read more in your November issue, Page 8.

“In search of a tactical torch” (June, Page 24) and “Brighter is better” (August, Page 37) by Lindsey Bertomen

  • SL-20L, Stinger LED, Sidewinder Compact II, and Night Com UV, Streamlight
  • BD-180-MH, BD-198-HLS, Tactical Balls, EPLI, Brite Strike
  • InfiniStar, TerraLux
  • 7060 and 8060, Pelican
  • HD Torch, Bushnell
  • Quark X AA Tactical, 4sevens
  • MX 431, Leupold
  • LightStar 80, TerraLUX
  • Dark Energy SOG DE-02, SOG
  • K3, Nextorch K3
  • HP 21, Coast

LEX 700, Motorola Solutions, and PTT Smartphone, Thales USA

“The public safety super phone” by Tabatha Wethal

In anticipation for the yet-to-come nationwide broadband network for first responders, multinational telecom companies have been at work developing the first LE-only mobile phones that do a whole lot more than yesterday’s commercial offerings. Motorola and Thales have devices ready to go in the next year or so that will offer LTE compatibility and will communicate off the national broadband wireless network currently under construction (figuratively) by standards-creating governing bodies like the National Institute of Technology and The National Public Safety Telecommunications Council.

“We are advancing a completely new category of public safety multimedia devices that provide first responders with unprecedented access to powerful applications and always-on public safety broadband,” says Bob Schassler, senior vice president in Radio Solutions at Motorola.

The devices are similar in offerings, which include a handheld “phone” (though both companies are reluctant to use that terminology, as well as Motorola was not crazy about the idea of calling a such device as a “public safety super phone”) company-exclusive plans for core apps for each device (a camera/video app, for example) and the ability for developers to create apps for the platforms similar to how the Apple and Android markets currently operate.

Motorola Solutions’ LEX 700 Mission Critical Handheld delivers a compact, rugged form factor with intuitive user interface and access to multimedia applications.

Bob Andreas, with Thales USA Defense & Security, explains the company’s handheld device will also offer PTT and other features integrated into a Long Term Evolution solution to accompany the national broadband network currently underway for U.S. public safety.

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